lacigreen:

what saying “not all men” actually does:

  • refuses to acknowledge that gender violence happens too often
  • takes the focus off the men who are violent and/or misogynistic
  • refuses to acknowledge that even good guys can enable the problem
  • makes the conversation about men and semantics instead of the epidemic levels of violence against women

what saying “not all men” does not do:

  • reveal a fascinating new insight that we didn’t know

(Source: lacigreeen, via assassinregrets)

Blackadder- French Revolution

(Source: youtube.com, via bunniesandbeheadings)

nouveau-jacobin:

Familiar name anyone?
(In hindsight, I probably only found this funny when I took it because it was half ten at night and I had copious amounts of sugar, but I still got a chuckle out of it so there.)

Yes!  My local grocery shops sell Brie de Meaux.  Hurrah for bad luck cheese!

nouveau-jacobin:

Familiar name anyone?

(In hindsight, I probably only found this funny when I took it because it was half ten at night and I had copious amounts of sugar, but I still got a chuckle out of it so there.)

Yes!  My local grocery shops sell Brie de Meaux.  Hurrah for bad luck cheese!

(via pilferingapples)

tggeko:

Judge Javert

tggeko:

Judge Javert

towritecomicsonherarms:

exactly
books0977:

Don Giovanni (1998).Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Cincinnati Opera. Rafal Olbinski (Polish, born 1945). Poster. 
Olbinski’s lush images and artwork are layered with complex psychology. He does not paint the landscape of scientific reality, but rather maps the interiors of the mind. Like Salvador Dali and Magritte before him, Olbinski’s work has poetic resonance — he depicts the mind as a theater of dreams, with new attractions around every corner.

books0977:

Don Giovanni (1998).Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Cincinnati Opera. Rafal Olbinski (Polish, born 1945). Poster. 

Olbinski’s lush images and artwork are layered with complex psychology. He does not paint the landscape of scientific reality, but rather maps the interiors of the mind. Like Salvador Dali and Magritte before him, Olbinski’s work has poetic resonance — he depicts the mind as a theater of dreams, with new attractions around every corner.

(via josephine-and-jewelry)

classicsenthusiast:

One of my favorites:

On the Establishment of the World Wide Web, 1990:

In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee constructed a giant net of woven fibers and cast it over the earth, from which the “web” gets its name.

On the San Francisco Earthquake, 1906:

Concerning the great earthquake, I was not able to gain any information from philosophers or scientists, nor could I gain any satisfactory explanation from the inhabitants of the city, who could explain neither why the great city had toppled nor why it had burned.

Some academicians, wishing to seem clever, have attempted to explain the motions of the earth in this place in the following way. They posit that all the earth is comprised of great plates of rock, like the ridges on a turtle’s back, and these float together on a sea of molten earth, and sometimes bump into one another like boats at anchor in the harbor, and that these jolts produce great perturbations of the earth. This is of course is absurd, for if the earth were so composed, then what is the turtle eating?

(Source: classicalcivilisation, via bobcatmoran)

teal-deer:

johnskylar:

sethshead:

johnskylar:

obsessivepuzzles:

johnskylar:

thevintagethimble:

Court presentation ensemble
1834. British (probably). Wool, silk, leather & metal. | THE MET

Wish outfits like this were still in style.

Anything is still in style if you wear it with enough panache! :D

Wearing a dueling sword, no matter how much panache one has, is illegal in New York City unless you’re going to a parade or Ren Fair in which you will be a participant.

Are there seriously parade and Renfair exceptions? How do I apply for them?! Tell me!!!!!

Yes, seriously.  It’s not something you apply for, it’s written into the NY Administrative Code, section 10-133, subsection 6:

(6) any person displaying or in possession of a knife otherwise in violation of this section when such knife (a) is being used for or transported immediately to or from a place where it is used for hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, picnicking or any employment, trade or occupation customarily requiring the use of such knife; or (b) is displayed or carried by a member of a theatrical group, drill team, military or para-military unit or veterans organization, to, from, or during a meeting, parade or other performance or practice for such event, which customarily requires the carrying of such knife; or (c) is being transported directly to or from a place of purchase, sharpening or repair, packaged in such a manner as not to allow easy access to such knife while it is transported; or (d) is displayed or carried by a duly enrolled member of the Boy or Girl Scouts of America or a similar organization or society and such display or possession is necessary to participate in the activities of such organization or society.

Ren Fair counts as a theatrical group.

This section is about knives, but I’ve heard that similar laws have the same exceptions for other bladed weapons.  Understandably, projectile weapons do not have the same exceptions.

Interestingly, I’m pretty sure that in the state of Maryland it IS still legal to openly carry bladed weapons (you just can’t carry them concealed)

This has lead to at least two incidents in Baltimore that I know of where people have defended themselves from robbery with swords

In one case, the guy was a professional stage combat guy and SCA participant. Some dude tried to mug him at gunpoint right after he got out of teaching a broadsword class. The mugger didn’t even get a shot off before he lost the hand carrying the gun.

During the trial, the prosecution (representing the mugger!) tried to claim that the defense had been carrying a concealed weapon. The defense lawyer just took out the broadsword, put it on the bench, and said “Where, exactly, would the defendant have concealed this?” 

Note: please do not go around carrying live steel around openly in MD, especially not in Baltimore. While it may be legal it’s still probably not a good idea. 

(via literaryreference)

audramcdonaldsbelt:

PSA that all theatre is valuable, quality is subjective, an imperfect show never hurt anybody, and we don’t talk about spider-man

(via geeneelee)

Tags: truth

theonlycheeseleft:

oilan:

A Courfeyrac, just for you! (Yes, you!) I hope this is satisfactory! XD

WHAT A GOOD COURFEYRAC FACE WOW.

theonlycheeseleft:

oilan:

A Courfeyrac, just for you! (Yes, you!) I hope this is satisfactory! XD

WHAT A GOOD COURFEYRAC FACE WOW.

groans:

yinqors:

maybe my favorite genre of pic

crows are dicks!

(via marylikesbirds)

"I think their primary prejudice is, Why does it have to take seven minutes to sing “I love you,” or five minutes to sing “I’m dying now”? I always say, “But that’s extremely fast.” Not in realistic terms, of course. But if you go to opera and expect realism, you’re really stupid. It’s not realism, obviously - even if we build a realistic set. Trying to express yourself about love in five minutes is fast. It can take two years to say that or to even understand that. Saying “I’m dying” in seven minutes is fast. Thinking about death occupies people from puberty through the rest of our lives. It’s the biggest existential question there is. But to express yourself about the feeling of dying, or the anxiety of dying, in seven minutes is actually pretty fast. My point is, in one evening, you go through in two and one-half hours what the rest of us spend our whole emotional lives living through. (…) It’s a workout, intense and focused - if you look for the emotional dimension and not the realistic one. Opera tries to show life as it is, not as it looks. (…) The reason it seems long is that we spend time on what’s important in life. When you look at your life, what’s going to define what it was? Not the everyday business, but the emotional highlights, disasters, or triumphs you had. That’s what we focus on in opera. and that’s because we have music."

— Kasper Bech Holten (director of the Danish Royal Opera) answering the question “Do you think your average spectators have difficulty investing themselves emotionally?” in Joshua Jampol’s book Living Opera (via operanerd)

(via pilferingapples)

Complete Guide To Shakespeare Tragedies.

stephaniesilver:

HAMLET

Ghost: You should kill the king.

Hamlet (for several acts): Should I?

*kills everyone else* *gets stabbed*

Hamlet: (dying) Yes, I should. *Kills the king* I’m king now. *dies*

Bland royal guy: Hamlet was okay. I’m king now.

MACBETH

Witches: You should kill the king.

Macbeth (for like four seconds): Should I?

Lady Macbeth: Yes, you should.

Macbeth: Okay *Kills the king*  I’m king now *kills everyone*

Lady Macbeth: *dies*

Macbeth: I refuse to acknowledge I’ve made a huge mistake! *dies*

Bland royal guy: Macbeth was terrible. I’m king now.

JULIUS CAESAR

Cassius: You should kill Caesar.

Brutus (for a few days): Should I?

Letters signed ‘TOTALLY NOT CASSIUS’: Yes, you should!

Brutus: Okay. *kills Caesar*

Brutus (for several acts): Did I make a huge mistake? *dies*

Mark Antony: Brutus was okay.

Bland royal guy: I’ll be king soon.

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA

Everyone: You should fight this war.

Cleopatra: Hi.

Mark Antony: (for several acts) No, I shouldn’t.

Everyone: Yes, you should.

Mark Antony: Okay.

Cleopatra: *fakes her death*

Mark Antony: *kills himself* I’ve made a huge mistake.

Cleopatra: I refuse to acknowledge I’ve made a huge mistake! *kills herself*

Bland royal guy: They were okay. I’m king now. 

OTHELLO

Iago: You should kill your wife.

Othello: (for several acts) No, I shouldn’t.

Iago: (for several acts)These extremely scientific experiments say you should.

Othello: Okay. *kills his wife*

Everyone: No, you shouldn’t have.

Othello: I’ve made a huge mistake *kills himself*

Everyone: We should tell the bland royal guys about this.

ROMEO AND JULIET

Bland royal guy: You shouldn’t kill anyone.

Romeo: (for a few acts) I completely agree

Juliet: Hi.

Romeo: (for a few acts) *kills everyone*

Juliet: *fakes her death*

Romeo: *kills self* I’ve made a huge mistake! *dies*

Juliet: *dies*

Bland royal guy: They were okay. I’m still prince.

TITUS ANDRONICUS

Titus and Tamora: You shouldn’t kill my family

Titus and Tamora: *kill each other’s and their own families*

Titus and Tamora: You shouldn’t have done that.

*they die*

 Titus’ bland son: My dad was okay. I’m king now.

RICHARD III:

Richard: I should kill everyone. *kills everyone* 

Everyone else: No, you shouldn’t. 

Richard: *kills them* I’m king now. 

Remaining few: We should tell the bland royal guy about this!

Richard: Oh. *dies*

Bland royal guy: Richard was terrible. I’m king now.

CORIOLANUS:

Everyone: You should fight this war and rule Rome

Coriolanus: *does*

Consul people: No, you shouldn’t

Everyone: We’ve made a huge mistake. *they exile him*

Aufidias: You should destroy Rome.

Everyone else: No, you shouldn’t

Coriolanus: Yes, I should

Coriolanus’ family: No, you shouldn’t

Coriolanus: Okay. *doesn’t*

Aufidias: You’ve made a huge mistake *kills him* Coriolanus was okay.  

Everyone: You’re still not king, though.

KING LEAR:

Everyone: HJUERRESRERGBESJREWBRNKWBT *dies*

Bland royal guy: That was terrible. I’m king now.

(via literaryreference)

cyan-013:

1.2.1 Le soir d’un jour de marche
Fahnestock & MacAfee

He took the main street, walked at random, slinking near the houses like a sad, humiliated man. Not once did he turn around. If he had, he would have seen the inn-keeper of the Croix de Colbas, standing in his doorway with all his guests, and the passersby gathered about him, speaking excitedly, and pointing at him; and from the looks of fear and distrust that were exchanged, he would have guessed that before long his arrival would be the talk of the whole town.
He saw nothing of all this: People weighed down with troubles do not look back; they know only too well that misfortune stalks them.

French:

Il prit la grande rue. Il marchait devant lui au hasard, rasant de près les maisons, comme un homme humilié et triste. Il ne se retourna pas une seule fois. S’il s’était retourné, il aurait vu l’aubergiste de la Croix-de-Colbas sur le seuil de sa porte, entouré de tous les voyageurs de son auberge et de tous les passants de la rue, parlant vivement et le désignant du doigt, et, aux regards de défiance et d’effroi du groupe, il aurait deviné qu’avant peu son arrivée serait l’événement de toute la ville.
Il ne vit rien de tout cela. Les gens accablés ne regardent pas derrière eux. Ils ne savent que trop que le mauvais sort les suit.

I seriously considered doing the bit with Petit-Gervais and his halo of golden hair against the light but then I had a stronger image for this one.

Read More

cyan-013:

1.2.1 Le soir d’un jour de marche

Fahnestock & MacAfee

He took the main street, walked at random, slinking near the houses like a sad, humiliated man. Not once did he turn around. If he had, he would have seen the inn-keeper of the Croix de Colbas, standing in his doorway with all his guests, and the passersby gathered about him, speaking excitedly, and pointing at him; and from the looks of fear and distrust that were exchanged, he would have guessed that before long his arrival would be the talk of the whole town.

He saw nothing of all this: People weighed down with troubles do not look back; they know only too well that misfortune stalks them.

French:

Il prit la grande rue. Il marchait devant lui au hasard, rasant de près les maisons, comme un homme humilié et triste. Il ne se retourna pas une seule fois. S’il s’était retourné, il aurait vu l’aubergiste de la Croix-de-Colbas sur le seuil de sa porte, entouré de tous les voyageurs de son auberge et de tous les passants de la rue, parlant vivement et le désignant du doigt, et, aux regards de défiance et d’effroi du groupe, il aurait deviné qu’avant peu son arrivée serait l’événement de toute la ville.

Il ne vit rien de tout cela. Les gens accablés ne regardent pas derrière eux. Ils ne savent que trop que le mauvais sort les suit.

I seriously considered doing the bit with Petit-Gervais and his halo of golden hair against the light but then I had a stronger image for this one.

Read More

spicedpiano:

astudyinawesome:

I’m crying

I might start watching Doctor Who again.

spicedpiano:

astudyinawesome:

I’m crying

I might start watching Doctor Who again.

(via assassinregrets)