pilferingapples:

swutol-sang-scopes:

Illustratethebrick: Un juste
1.1.4: Les œuvres semblables aux paroles

Madame Magloire l’appelait volontiers Votre Grandeur. Un jour il se leva de son fauteuil et alla à sa bibliothèque chercher un livre. Ce livre était sur un des rayons d’en haut. Comme l’évêque était d’assez petite taille, il ne put y atteindre. – Madame Magloire, dit-il, apportez-moi une chaise. Ma Grandeur ne va pas jusqu’à cette planche.
Madame Magloire liked to call him ‘Your Highness’. One day he rose from his armchair and went to his bookcase to fetch a book. This book was on one of the top shelves. As the bishop was rather small in stature, he could not reach it. ‘Madame Magloire,’ he said, ‘bring me a chair. My Highness falls short of that shelf.’

(Donougher’s translation, as the first one I could find that actually translated the pun.)
I confess that I had no particular reason for drawing this scene except that I found it funny. Originally I had planned to draw him standing on his tiptoes to reach the top shelf, but somewhere along the way that morphed into the idea that, having got the book, he would become so absorbed in reading it that he would forget to get down off the chair, and so here we are. I imagine that Madame Magloire is standing just out of the picture shaking her head at him.
I gave up fairly quickly on trying to understand 19th century ecclesiastical dress, so I have drawn a generic sort of cassock on the basis that, considering that the Bishop wears them to rags anyway, he probably wouldn’t mind too much. I tried for a purplish tone where the cloth has worn, because I liked the idea of the tattiness making the colour more appropriate for a bishop; it seemed like the sort of irony Myriel might enjoy.
This was also a bit of an experiment in painting with a limited palette: Yellow Ochre, Carmine and Ultramarine. (This is the other reason why his cassock is a bit purple; I can’t mix a good black in watercolours, it seems.) It was smartened up a bit post-scanning in GIMP, although not very well because I’ve never used it before and the controls confuse me.
Anyway, I’ll stop blathering now. Here, have a Bishop. And a chair. And too many books.
Constructive criticism is welcomed and if I don’t acknowledge it it’s probably because I’m awkward rather than because I’m offended.

WOW, you chose to make a whole lotta straight lines in watercolor. 0_o  Kudos to you!
(I think it’s good idea to stay away from pure black in general, unless you’ve got a good compositional reason to use it; look how nice that dark purple looks! And the limited palette works well with the Bishop’s generally ascetic life, I think.)

pilferingapples:

swutol-sang-scopes:

Illustratethebrick: Un juste

1.1.4: Les œuvres semblables aux paroles

Madame Magloire l’appelait volontiers Votre Grandeur. Un jour il se leva de son fauteuil et alla à sa bibliothèque chercher un livre. Ce livre était sur un des rayons d’en haut. Comme l’évêque était d’assez petite taille, il ne put y atteindre. – Madame Magloire, dit-il, apportez-moi une chaise. Ma Grandeur ne va pas jusqu’à cette planche.

Madame Magloire liked to call him ‘Your Highness’. One day he rose from his armchair and went to his bookcase to fetch a book. This book was on one of the top shelves. As the bishop was rather small in stature, he could not reach it. ‘Madame Magloire,’ he said, ‘bring me a chair. My Highness falls short of that shelf.’

(Donougher’s translation, as the first one I could find that actually translated the pun.)

I confess that I had no particular reason for drawing this scene except that I found it funny. Originally I had planned to draw him standing on his tiptoes to reach the top shelf, but somewhere along the way that morphed into the idea that, having got the book, he would become so absorbed in reading it that he would forget to get down off the chair, and so here we are. I imagine that Madame Magloire is standing just out of the picture shaking her head at him.

I gave up fairly quickly on trying to understand 19th century ecclesiastical dress, so I have drawn a generic sort of cassock on the basis that, considering that the Bishop wears them to rags anyway, he probably wouldn’t mind too much. I tried for a purplish tone where the cloth has worn, because I liked the idea of the tattiness making the colour more appropriate for a bishop; it seemed like the sort of irony Myriel might enjoy.

This was also a bit of an experiment in painting with a limited palette: Yellow Ochre, Carmine and Ultramarine. (This is the other reason why his cassock is a bit purple; I can’t mix a good black in watercolours, it seems.) It was smartened up a bit post-scanning in GIMP, although not very well because I’ve never used it before and the controls confuse me.

Anyway, I’ll stop blathering now. Here, have a Bishop. And a chair. And too many books.

Constructive criticism is welcomed and if I don’t acknowledge it it’s probably because I’m awkward rather than because I’m offended.

WOW, you chose to make a whole lotta straight lines in watercolor. 0_o  Kudos to you!

(I think it’s good idea to stay away from pure black in general, unless you’ve got a good compositional reason to use it; look how nice that dark purple looks! And the limited palette works well with the Bishop’s generally ascetic life, I think.)

swanjolras:

HEY the fcc’s website fuckin’ crashed because of how overwhelmed with net neutrality comments it was

(and also because the fcc’s comment system is 17 years old, because, uh, why would the federal communications commission want to have up-to-date communications systems, that would just. be silly.)

anyway, the point is: the deadline for comments has been extended

the eff has made it ridiculously easy for you to yell at the fcc; they have this thing where you select options from a drop-down menu, it’s cute as hell

go, go, go

(via bobcatmoran)

emilyenrose:

fozmeadows:

scienceofsarcasm:

Evening Post: August 12, 1899.
"She immediately alighted, caught hold of the astonished youth, and gave him a sound thrashing, using her fists in a scientific fashion…”

I would love to know what this means.

I think that might be code for “punched him in the balls with devastating accuracy”.

I think the sport of boxing was (is?) often referred to as a science! In the older sense of ‘something that requires expert knowledge’. So if she thrashed him in scientific fashion, it implies that she had some expert knowledge of how to punch people, possibly learned from someone with some formal training!

(via literaryreference)

michaelmoonsbookshop:

The Kiss of the oceans - postcard from 1923

michaelmoonsbookshop:

The Kiss of the oceans - postcard from 1923

(via michaelmoonsbookshop)

Tags: i ship it

witchofspacetime:

OH MY GOD I FINALLY FOUND IT

THIS IS MY FAVORITE THOR PAGE OF ALL TIME 

(Source: , via assassinregrets)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

The Electricity Fairy, a poster design by David Dellepiane for the ‘Exposition International d’Electricité’ held in Marseille in 1908.
Source

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

The Electricity Fairy, a poster design by David Dellepiane for the ‘Exposition International d’Electricité’ held in Marseille in 1908.

Source

lu-the-ood:

I’ve decided that there aren’t enough classic who edits out there

lu-the-ood:

I’ve decided that there aren’t enough classic who edits out there

(via geeneelee)

nprbooks:

Image via the New York Times
Awww, bless their little hearts; the NYT has discovered how many working F/SF writers are influenced by Dungeons & Dragons!  They’ve got a great quote from our perennial literary crush Junot Diaz: 

Playing D&D and spinning tales of heroic quests, “we welfare kids could travel,” Mr. Díaz, 45, said in an email interview, “have adventures, succeed, be powerful, triumph, fail and be in ways that would have been impossible in the larger real world.”
“For nerds like us, D&D hit like an extra horizon,” he added. The game functioned as “a sort of storytelling apprenticeship.”

They actually dig pretty deeply into the relationship between D&D and traditional storytelling:

What makes a D&D story different from novels and other narratives is its improvisational and responsive nature. Plotlines are decided as a group. As a D&D player, “you have to convince other players that your version of the story is interesting and valid,” said Jennifer Grouling, an assistant professor of English at Ball State University who studied D&D players for her book, “The Creation of Narrative in Tabletop Role-Playing Games.”
If a Dungeon Master creates “a boring world with an uninteresting plot,” she said, players can go in a completely different direction; likewise, the referee can veto the action of player. “I think D&D can help build the skills to work collaboratively and to write collaboratively,” she added. (Mr. Díaz called this the “social collaborative component” of D&D.)

The rebooted D&D starter kit is out today — but really all you need is paper, pencils, dice, and imagination.  Go tell some stories!
— Petra (chaotic good half-elf sorceror, in case you’re wondering)

nprbooks:

Image via the New York Times

Awww, bless their little hearts; the NYT has discovered how many working F/SF writers are influenced by Dungeons & Dragons!  They’ve got a great quote from our perennial literary crush Junot Diaz: 

Playing D&D and spinning tales of heroic quests, “we welfare kids could travel,” Mr. Díaz, 45, said in an email interview, “have adventures, succeed, be powerful, triumph, fail and be in ways that would have been impossible in the larger real world.”

“For nerds like us, D&D hit like an extra horizon,” he added. The game functioned as “a sort of storytelling apprenticeship.”

They actually dig pretty deeply into the relationship between D&D and traditional storytelling:

What makes a D&D story different from novels and other narratives is its improvisational and responsive nature. Plotlines are decided as a group. As a D&D player, “you have to convince other players that your version of the story is interesting and valid,” said Jennifer Grouling, an assistant professor of English at Ball State University who studied D&D players for her book, “The Creation of Narrative in Tabletop Role-Playing Games.”

If a Dungeon Master creates “a boring world with an uninteresting plot,” she said, players can go in a completely different direction; likewise, the referee can veto the action of player. “I think D&D can help build the skills to work collaboratively and to write collaboratively,” she added. (Mr. Díaz called this the “social collaborative component” of D&D.)

The rebooted D&D starter kit is out today — but really all you need is paper, pencils, dice, and imagination.  Go tell some stories!

— Petra (chaotic good half-elf sorceror, in case you’re wondering)

(Source: maedhrys, via maedhrys)

pilferingapples:

unhooking-the-stars:

nouveau amis

You know, it might be an odd thing to notice here, but I really like the shadows on his face here—the colors make it really effective!

pilferingapples:

unhooking-the-stars:

nouveau amis

You know, it might be an odd thing to notice here, but I really like the shadows on his face here—the colors make it really effective!

notyourdroid:

PSC CS 2 + Wacom Bamboo Pen. Terry Pratchett’s Havelock Vetinari.

notyourdroid:

PSC CS 2 + Wacom Bamboo Pen. Terry Pratchett’s Havelock Vetinari.

(via geeneelee)

moxycrimefighter:

genoshaisforlovers:

I’m just sayin’

That sound you’re hearing is the sound of SHOTS BEING FIRED

moxycrimefighter:

genoshaisforlovers:

I’m just sayin’

That sound you’re hearing is the sound of SHOTS BEING FIRED

(via septembriseur)

gauzythreads:

today’s sunrise

bunniesandbeheadings:

A Defender of the Bastille Speaks: Swiss officer Louis de Flue describes his role in protecting what was, in his view, an obscure outpost unrelated to the political upheavals in Versailles.

image
Having received orders from the baron de Bezenval, I left on 7 July at 2 in the morning with a detachment of 32 men … we crossed Paris without difficulty and arrived at the Bastille where I entered with my troops… . During my next few days there, the Governor showed me around the place, the spots he thought the strongest and those the weakest. He showed me all the precautions that he had taken… . He complained of the small size of his garrison and of the impossibility of guarding the place if attacked. I told him his fears were unfounded, that the place was well fortified and that the garrison was sufficient if each would do his duty to defend it… .

Read More